Philadelphia, 2005: Some Discoveries, part 5

Here's a tile we found at the corner of 11th & Chestnut. As with many of the other covered tiles we found, you can see the surrounding tarmac looks quite fresh. As the tile was already well-embedded into the tarmac the protective cover came away very easily, revealing a fresh – and unusually, green – tile. My mobile next to it lets you see how small this one is:

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Philadelphia, October 2005: Some Discoveries, part 3

Here's another tile we began to uncover at the corner of Broad & S. Penn. Square, but finally left it only partially uncovered as we soon noticed the white surface of the tile was also coming away. Best to leave it rather than damage it, but I wonder why some tiles are adhered to concrete tiles beneath, in which it would be next to impossible to embed them.
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Philadelphia, October 2005: Some Discoveries, part 2

Walking back to my hotel to meet up with Fred, I did notice a few small brown/grey rectangular patches at certain intersections in downtown Philly. I was obviously not completely familiar with the process by which Toynbee Tiles were laid but they were certainly of the right size, and I peeled away the corner of one (of two spotted) at Broad & Sansom to uncover what was very probably a new tile underneath. Later that morning, while Fred kept passers-by amused/baffled as to what we were doing, I chipped away the rest of the tar paper cover to reveal a fresh tile underneath:

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I used the screwdriver attachment of my Swiss Army knife as I didn't want to damage the tile with anything sharp. Nevertheless I discovered that unless the tar paper cover is easily separated from the tile it's a difficult job, so unless the cover comes away by using fingers only I now wouldn't recommend forcing the cover's separation. The remaining tar left adhered to the tile will probably wear away over time.

Philadelphia, October 2005: Some Discoveries, part 1

On Thursday 20th October godelescherbach (who shall henceforth be referred to as Fred) and I met up to wander the streets of Philadelphia in search of Toynbee Tiles. We found several, but also made plenty of new discoveries.

Earlier that morning before Fred arrived at my hotel, I had taken a walk around the city and at many of the locations of tiles listed at toynbee.net I drew a blank, except for this tiny tile buried in bricks at the junction of 15th & Walnut:

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Boston, October 2005

On Monday 17th October I checked out the known tiles listed at toynbee.net. Of these six sites in Boston I drew a blank on all but one, at the junction of Tremont Ave. & Temple Place:

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Either the rest are still visible somewhere at their respective locations (the vague one-liners provided at toynbee.net are often not that helpful, as intersections often cover a large area) or, probably more likely, I couldn't find them because they have been lost under fresh tarmac.